Notification for members and friends

We will not have a meeting on our Second Thursday of the month due to the Portland Regional Gem and Mineral Show at the Clackamas Fairgrounds in Canby Oregon. 

Many of us will be down there helping out. If you have not yet volunteered I strongly encourage membership to put in at least 2 hours while your down there and you will be able to get free entry for all three days and visit with old and new friends! Please put in some time on set up Wednesday or take down on Sunday, We still need help kids corner, silent auction and ticketing.

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Meet the Authors Events at Portland Regional Gem and Mineral Show

This year, the Portland Regional Gem and Mineral Show will host “Meet the Authors” events throughout the weekend event, October 9-11, 2015, at the Washington County Fairplex.

We are fortunate this year to have Marli Miller speaking about her book “Roadside Geology of Oregon” at the Portland Regional show in Hillsboro, Oregon on Friday and Saturday.

Marli Miller is a senior instructor and researcher in the Dept. of Geological Sciences at the University of Oregon, where she’s been since 1997. Most recently, she completed a complete rewrite of the book Road-side Geology of Oregon (Published by Mountain Press in Missoula), which provided the inspiration for her presentation. Her primary interests lie in in the fields of regional and structural geology. She earned her M.S. and Ph.D. in geology at the University of Washington in 1987 and 1992 respectively and a B.A. in geology at Colorado College in 1982. As a photographer, she concentrates on geological images, and contributes regularly to textbooks, museum exhibits, journals, and teaching collections of other instructors. Her website offers free downloads of more than 2000 images for non-commercial use. Marli is scheduled to speak Friday and Saturday of the show.

Julian Gray will speak about his book “Minerals of Georgia” at the Portland Regional show in Hillsboro, Oregon on Sunday at 3:00 pm. He is the executive director of the Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals, in Hillsboro, Oregon and the former curator of the Tellus Science Museum in Cartersville, Georgia. A Georgia native, Julian studied at Georgia State University where he earned his Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in geology. Julian has worked with the United States Geological Survey and a number of commercial laboratories and environmental consulting firms. Continue reading “Meet the Authors Events at Portland Regional Gem and Mineral Show”

Field Trip: Pink Limb Area and Glass Buttes

We’re heading to the Pink Limb area and Glass Buttes for some pink limb and various kinds of obsidian in a trip put together by Brian True for August 16-17, 2014.

Please bring camping gear or make other arrangements for lodging, along with food and water.

Contact us for more information and to register for the field trip so we have a count of how many are going.

Field Trip: Saddle Mountain, Washington

We’re heading for Saddle Mountain in Washington State July 12-13, 2014.

Come join us as we hunt petrified wood and bog wood.

This is an unguided field trip but there will be experts there to help you along the way. Brian True put these together, so he has additional information.

Please bring your camping gear or make other arrangements for lodging.

Contact us for more information and to register for the field trip so we have a count of how many are going.

Jade: Did You Know There are More Than Two Types?

The following is by Tualatin Valley Rock and Gem Club member Taylor Hunt. if you would like to contribute to our newsletter and website with articles on various rocks, minerals, and gems, please contact us.

The gemstone jadeite generally forms as a result of the plate tectonic process of subduction. Jade made from jadeite forms when supercritical fluids from subducting oceanic crust condense in the overlying man-tel wedge (the “wedge” is all the sediments swept up, piled and squeezed between the subducting oceanic plate and a continental mass), between 20 & 60 km deep in the Earth. Jadeite deposits thus mark the loca-tion of exhumed fossil subduction zones.

A new term PTG’s, plate tectonic gemstone, and jadeite is one PTG currently recognized. For various reasons most PTG’s are found in rocks or continental plates considered young to planet Earth. Most are no older than the formation of the supercontinent of Rodinia or 1,000 ma yr. Petrotectonic indicators that form deep in the Earth have the added advantage that their record is unlikely to be obliterated by erosion. Recognition of the PTG’s links modern concepts of plate tectonics to economic gemstones deposits and the ancient concepts of beauty, and may aid in exploration for new deposits.

Any mineral or stone beautiful enough to be sought, mined and sold for its beauty alone is a gemstone. The subclass of rocks and minerals that comprise gemstones—whether precious or semi-precious—has mostly been established since antiquity. Humans have sought and prized gemstones since thousands of years be-fore the science of geology was established. Because gemstones are rare by definition, the geological conditions that produce them must have been exceptional. Thus, there is a confluence of economic, aesthetic and academic interest in gemstones. Jade — specifically the variety jadeite — is the characteristic beautiful product of normal oceanic lithosphere subduction.

The following images are from Wiki Commons and Flickr contributors, used under copyright and public domain free image licenses.

Jade is a term ascribed to two different materials with similar properties, toughness, and beauty that evolved in usage and significance from toolstones for axes, choppers and hammers to one of the most highly revered gemstones in the world. As a tool, jade was employed during the Paleolithic (stone age, before 3500 BCE) but was raised to high symbolic stature as a gemstone in proto—Chinese Hongshan and Liangzhu cultures by 3500 BCE, and in the Jom’on culture of Japan by 3000 BCE, and in Central America by the Olmec of the Early Formative period by at least 1500 BCE and later in the Mayan civilization. Hard jade (jadeitite) or “ying yu” in Chinese consists predominately of pyroxene minerals, jadeite (Na,Al,Si2,O8), while soft jade (nephrite jade) “ruan yu” come from amphibole minerals of tremolite-actinolite [Ca2(Mg,Fe)5,Si8O22(OH)2]. The term jade was derived from the Spanish “piedra de yjada” (loin stone) for talismans worn by the Aztec to ease abdominal pain, but was mistranslated to the word jade. In New Zealand, nephrite jade is sometimes called greenstone and was a favorite of the Maoris. Continue reading “Jade: Did You Know There are More Than Two Types?”

Adopt-a-Mineral at the Rice Northwest Museum – Fluorite

The Rice has a great program called Adopt-a-Mineral, allowing the public to donate to the museum by adopting a rock and mineral. The following article is about one of those minerals, fluorite, available for adoption now.

Fluorite (AM 29, AM 30)

Carlo Galeani Napione named the mineral fluorite in the late 1700s. The name derives from the Latin “fleure”, meaning flow, because it is commonly used as a flux. Fluorite is a halide, in which a metal is bonded to one of the halogen elements (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine).

The following images are used courtesy of Wiki Commons.

Fluorite is commonly translucent and found with a vitreous (glassy) luster. It has many colors including, green, purple, yellow, pink, brown and colorless. Its streak (color of the powdered mineral) is white. Fluorite has a hardness of ~4 and is the hardness reference species on Mohs’ scale. It is a brittle mineral, and it will fracture and break along perfect cubic and octahedral cleavage planes. Fluorite usually occurs as cubes, although it can also be found as octahedra (8-faced crystals), and rarely as dodecahedra (12-faced crystals). Sometimes these forms can be found combined in single crystals. When not seen as large crystalline specimens, fluorite is usu-ally massive, or an aggregate of very small cubes. Continue reading “Adopt-a-Mineral at the Rice Northwest Museum – Fluorite”

Field Trip: Succor Creek Area

On June 16-18, 2014, we’re heading on a field trip to the Succor Creek area of the Idaho/Oregon border.

We will be hunting thundereggs, jasper, pink plume agate, plume agate, and more rocks and minerals.

This is a guided 3-day field trip, but you will need to make your own arrangements for camping or lodging. Brian True is coordinating these field trips.

Contact us for more information and to register for the field trip so we have a count of how many are going.

Field Trip: Hall Museum of Minerals, La Center, Washington

May 4, 2013, we will be having a field trip to the Hall Museum of Minerals in La Center, Washington.

The field trip includes a tour of the museum and potluck, so bring food to share with everyone.

We will be meeting at the Forest Grove Senior and Community Center in Forest Grove, Oregon, and leaving by 9:15AM. We expect to arrive at the museum at 10:30AM if you are driving on your own. Let’s try to carpool to make this more fun.

The museum houses more than 40 years of collecting by Richard and Bernice Hall. They have an amazingly diverse collection of rock slabs, petrified wood, crystals, and polished slabs, spheres, and even rock carvings.

Richard and Bernice Hall have won hundreds of awards for their work in rock collecting and exhibits.

Richard has promised a tour of his machine shops, demonstrating how to cut, drill, polish, sand, grind, and do everything to various rocks and minerals.

This is a very special treat and we look forward to having a fun and educational day.

If you want to come with us, please contact us and let us know so we have an estimate of how many will be attending.