Smartphones Help Create Global Sesmic Network

MyShake App - Zoom Into Map for Recent Earthquakes ViewIf you have a smartphone, why not join others worldwide to help track earthquakes.

For the past few years, the US Geological Survey department and others want to know how cell phones can be used to monitor and possibly detect earthquakes. Inside of each phone are sensors that can be used to create a worldwide seismic network to help with the study of earthquakes.

A couple weeks ago, it was announced that The University of California at Berkely has released MyShake and MyQuake. MyShake is for Android users and MyQuake is the Apple version.

The app is free and runs “silently” in the background. The app has the ability to distinguish between natural body and transportation movements and ground disturbances. The goal of the app is to collect enough data to help track earthquakes in a way that may lead to a global early warning system.

The app offers four key features in addition to collecting and transmitting earth movement data to Berkeley.

  • Recent: The Recent tab displays earthquake data globally with a magnitude of 2.5 or more within the past 7 days. Using a Google Map, the user may zoom around the globe to observer recent earthquake activity.
  • Safety: Simple steps to ensure the user is familiar with how to take cover before, during, and after an earthquake.
  • Senor: While mostly for fun, shake the phone around and you will see the phone’s senor record the movement.
  • Past: This is another Google Map highlighting the most powerful and noteworthy earthquakes throughout known history, some dating back hundreds of years.

According to “With “MyShake” App, Your Phone Feels Earthquakes and Automatically Warns Scientists” in Popular Mechanics, says: Continue reading “Smartphones Help Create Global Sesmic Network”

Advertisements